B-1 “Do Good Plus Do No Harm” Series

On This Page:

  • Field Guide Volumes in This Training Series
  • General Orientation to the Training Series Content
  • A “Linear” Table of Contents for the Three-Volume Series

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Do Good Plus Do No Harm Masthead 2

Do Good Plus Do No Harm ~ Cover art, “Pathway of Peace” ~ Original quilt design and production by Sonja Naylor Andrews, image used by permission.

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“Do Good Plus Do No Harm”

Creating Common Ground for the Common Good,

and Applying Opal Design for the Quadruple Bottom Line

by Brad Sargent aka “futuristguy”

Pathway to Peace 1

“Pathway of Peace” ~ Original quilt design and production by Sonja Naylor Andrews, image used by permission.

Field Guide Volumes in This Training Series

As a general note, I use the terms volume and field guide interchangeably. Here are the titles of the seven field guides in the series, plus the themes and topics they address:

1. Building Organization

Deconstructing Systems that Damage and Setting Up Spaces that Empower.

FIELD GUIDE #1 ~ INTERPRETING SYSTEMIC ABUSE

FIELD GUIDE #2 ~ OFFERING PERSONAL ADVOCACY

FIELD GUIDE #3 ~ PLANTING SOCIAL ACTIVISM

2. Orienteering Transformation and Processing Information

Assembling Concept Frameworks and Exercising Critical Thinking Skills.

FIELD GUIDE #4 ~ PROFILING PARADIGM SYSTEMS

FIELD GUIDE #5 ~ TRANSFORMING OUR TRAJECTORIES

3. Facilitating Participation

Compositing Ventures that Transform and Measuring Their Quadruple Bottom Line Impact.

FIELD GUIDE #6 ~ COMPOSITING POSITIVE VENTURES

FIELD GUIDE #7 ~ DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

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General Orientation to the Training Series Content

Field Guide Descriptions

Building Organization – This set of three field guides (#1, 2, 3) focuses on how things can go terribly wrong, even when we want to do right, and how to build trustworthy endeavors that empower instead of abuse, and get organizational or project start-ups and transitions on a healthy trajectory from the get-go.

Orienteering Transformation and Processing Information – The second set, with two field guides (#4, 5) , sets up the concepts and thinking skills for making a constructive difference in our world by working together. It touches on seven different aspects of paradigm systems – the main concept that is part of what distinguishes this training series from anything else I’ve heard about or seen over the years:

  1. Information processing styles – the deepest aspects of how we think that affects all else in terms of what we think and do.
  2. Beliefs – theories, philosophies, theologies.
  3. Values – what we care about enough to live out in terms of: who we are as individuals, what constitutes a/the “good life,” what we think the world should look like, and how we should treat one another.
  4. Organizational strategies – the abstract, theoretical principles and processes of what brings us together in a more formal organization, such as our purpose (why we got connected), our mission (who we want to serve), and our vision (what we hope the world looks like as a result of what we do).
  5. Organizational structures – the concrete, practical activities and procedures that help us carry out our strategy, such as documents and archives, communication routes and routines, and project evaluation checklists.
  6. Cultures – the everyday items and activities of our lives and our lifestyles, as individuals and in community.
  7. Collaborations – who we are willing to work with (or avoid) and how, and why, when it comes to anything from teams to projects to politics to social movements.

The other volumes in the series expand out various elements within these seven dimensions. So, don’t be too surprised when I bring up a particular topic and deal with it only in an introductory way in this first field guide. I’ve intentionally interwoven the concept threads in the series, so what may seem like missing or “disappearing” details will likely show up later, integrated with more depth into a later concept section, workbook exercise, or volume in the series.

Facilitating Participation – The third set, with two field guides (#6, 7), addresses how to composite strength-based teams, put together project partnerships, and create larger collaborations. It also includes how to evaluate our efforts along the way and implement course corrections to a trajectory of transformation.

So, now that you’ve seen this general overview of the series, here is another layer of detail with the volume titles, key topics, and major questions in each of the field guides for the Do Good Plus Do No Harm training series.

Format Elements

Each of the three mini-series (building organization, processing information, facilitating participation) has two main topics, developed through two or three field guides. Each field guide has three sections. Each section consists of a set of 10 chapters (articles) and three workbook-type items to help students integrate the material in the 10 chapters. Workbook chapters could include film studies, teamwork exercises, and/or historical and contemporary case studies. (So, with 13 segments, each field guide is a self-contained training series “quarterly.”) Most chapters have a short “After Thoughts …” section at the end, usually containing a few questions for personal reflection and group discussion.

There isn’t a set number of words per article – although I’ve tried to keep the length under 1,500 words in any given article, plus another 500-750 words for the reflection/discussion questions. My key has been to aim for accessibility – reasonably sized “chunks” of information that are more approachable and more easily digestible, instead of trying to force-fit highly complex information into an arbitrary box, usually that is too small for it.

Also, I’ve designed this training series for reflective reading – not speed reading. A lot of the articles are short, but dense. Many of them include images as illustrations, so that words and pictures complement each other. There are points in each article and visual to think about, and maybe to spark some synthesis.

So, please do yourself a favor: Relax, read and view, reflect. Going fast just to get done won’t get you to a preferable future any quicker than a reasoned pace. In fact, it might just have the opposite effect to what you were hoping for.

Finally, I will be introducing quite a bit of vocabulary that may be unfamiliar, from all kinds of artistic and academic disciples. Don’t let that rattle you – or, well, not too much. Many times, I’ll define the word in the same sentence or paragraph, and give a description and/or visual image shortly thereafter. The next time I use the term, I’ll likely add some different shades of meaning to it, or give a synonym, or list other features.

“Externalizing”

Also, you may notice that I sometimes explain why I’m doing what I’m doing, or the process for how I arrived at a particular conclusion. That’s called externalizing, and I believe it’s crucial to translating a mindset rather than just transferring information.

NOTE: The externalizing sections are NOT “throwaways” I threw in to pad the books. I use this technique regularly to help build bridges across conflicting paradigms that usually end up in people groups having culture clashes. If we work on teams with people from a diversity of backgrounds, externalizing could turn out to be a great tool for understanding. Such segments may seem like an interruption to the flow of things at times, but I’m doing it right there for a reason, even if that’s not totally apparent at the time.

Anyway, I hope you’ll come to appreciate the use of this tool throughout the training series, and learn to use it yourself as a way to share insight into your thinking process and not just downloading your conclusions.

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A “Linear” Table of Contents for the Three-Part Series

In the field guides, I present the table of contents in two different ways, one for those who are more “word-smart” in their processing style, the other for those who are more “picture-smart.” These terms come from the theory of multiple intelligences developed by Howard Gardner. This two-part approach is also my nod to a very fascinating book, Left-Brain Finance for Right Brain People by Paula Ann Monroe. The conventional, linear version is below. (For now, I’ll save the non-linear, mind-mapping style versions for the published versions.)

So, here are the seven field guide volumes and the three sections in each. For the expanded versions that include the questions dealt with in each section, see the Field Guide individual pages.

3 Volumes & Themes

“Control Center” © Scott Maxwell / Fotolia #6929682.

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4 Major Themes b

1. Building Organization

Deconstructing Systems that Damage

and Setting Up Spaces that Empower.

FIELD GUIDE #1 ~ INTERPRETING SYSTEMIC ABUSE

  • Section #1 – Basics of Systems
  • Section #2 – Basics of Systemic Abuse
  • Section #3 – Key Identifiers for Malignant Leaders and Their Toxic Systems

FIELD GUIDE #2 ~ OFFERING PERSONAL ADVOCACY

  • Section #4 – Authoritarians Who Steal Our Stories
  • Section #5 – Destructive Impacts of Trauma and Terror
  • Section #6 – Abuse Survivors Find Resilience and Recovery

FIELD GUIDE #3 ~ PLANTING SOCIAL ACTIVISM

  • Section #7 – Advocates and Activists Resist Evil, Amplify Redemptive Movement
  • Section #8 – Remediation for Sick Organizations
  • Section #9 – People of Peace, Positive Start-Ups, and Preventive Maintenance

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2. Orienteering Transformation and Processing Information

Assembling Concept Frameworks

and Exercising Critical Thinking Skills.

FIELD GUIDE #4 ~ PROFILING PARADIGM SYSTEMS

  • Section #10 – Getting the Big Picture of “Do Good Plus Do No Harm”
  • Section #11 – Embarking on This Journey – and a “Field Guide” for the Trip
  • Section #12 –Paradigms – The “V” System for Identifying Toxic Versus Trustworthy Enterprises

FIELD GUIDE #5 ~ TRANSFORMING OUR TRAJECTORIES

  • Section #13 – Toxicity, Health, and Plotting a Transformational Course Ahead
  • Section #14 – Perceptions and Perspectives – Learning Styles and Cultural Correlates
  • Section #15 – Pathways – Story Arcs and Trajectories of Transformation

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3. Facilitating Participation

Compositing Ventures that Transform

and Measuring Their Quadruple Bottom Line Impact.

FIELD GUIDE #6 ~ COMPOSITING POSITIVE VENTURES

  • Section #16 – Colleagues – Identifying Complementary Strengths Among Peers
  • Section #17 – Teams – Compositing Transcultural Teams for Catalyzing Social Action
  • Section #18 – Associations – Engaging in Supportive Project Partnerships and Collaborations

FIELD GUIDE #7 ~ DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

  • Section #19 – “The Zone” – Creating Common Ground and Overcoming Cultural Conflict
  • Section #20 – Holistic Projects – Designing and Developing Robust Social Enterprise Projects
  • Section #21 – Follow-Through – Measuring What Matters with Quadruple Bottom Line* Impact

* Quadruple Bottom Line (QBL) is an integrated approach to consider how our actions simultaneously benefit (or harm) the set of four “bottom lines” – community, ecology, economy, and spirituality.

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